October's Birthstone - Tourmaline

By Julie O'Shaughnessy
on October 01, 2018

October's Birthstone - Tourmaline

Luckily for us, the Empress Dowager Cixi didn’t buy up the entire world’s supply of pink tourmaline, as evidenced by our beautiful sterling silver Irish Claddagh ring with a pink tourmaline stone set as the heart. This ring, paired with these dainty Claddagh earrings with simulated pink tourmaline stones set as the hearts and a matching Claddagh pendant will have your October born loved ones (or yourself!) dancing for joy.
 

Read more »

Peridot - August and the Goddess of Fire

By Julie O'Shaughnessy
on August 06, 2018

Peridot  -  August  and  the  Goddess  of  Fire

If you or a loved one has an August birthday, you are in luck! August, like the months of December and June, is one of only three months to have multiple gemstones from which to choose. Sardonyx was the original August birthstone, then later peridot was added and became the best known August birthstone. Most recently, those born in August can also choose the lovely spinel as their birthstone gem.

Read more »

The Ruby - July’s ‘King of Gems’ Birthstone

By Julie O'Shaughnessy
on July 05, 2018

July Birthstone Blog post - Celtic by Design

July’s birthstone is known as the king of precious stones, the gorgeous red ruby. The ruby’s name is derived from the Latin Rubeus meaning red and these beautiful gemstones have been treasured for centuries for their fluorescent vibrant color. A ruby is really a red form of corundum, with all other colors being sapphires.

Read more »

Blue Topaz - December’s Icy Birthstone

By Julie O'Shaughnessy
on December 07, 2017

Blue Topaz - December’s Icy Birthstone

With the winter season comes ice and snow. The beautiful golds and muted browns of fall are gone now, and in their place, the blue of the sky is reflected on frozen ponds. This icy color is reminiscent of this month’s birthstone, the blue topaz.

 

Celtic Knot Birthstone Pendant - December


The name ‘Topaz’ comes from Topazios, which is the name given by the ancient Greeks to St. John’s Island in the Red Sea. Yellow gems were mined on this island but in all likelihood, they were not topaz. However, the name soon became applied to all yellow gems. Topaz is mentioned in the King James Bible as well as in ancient Greek texts, but it’s not at all certain that these texts actually referred to true topaz or to other yellow gems.

Topaz, in its pure state, is actually colorless. Like so many other birthstones, it’s the presence of impurities in the stone that give it color and life. Topaz ranges from a brownish orange to a yellowish color, with the most sought-after color being imperial topaz, which is a vibrant orange with undertones of pink.

Although blue topaz has become increasingly available, it’s rarely found in nature and is usually produced by radiation treatment of common colorless topaz. A light blue variety of topaz is found in Texas, and although it is not commercially mined, the blue topaz became an official gemstone of Texas in 1969. Utah has also honored blue topaz as its state gemstone.

Most topaz comes from South America, with Brazil the largest producer. The stone is also mined in Nigeria, India, Sri Lanka, Pakistan, Australia, Germany, and Mexico. Topaz is also found in the United States, mostly in New Hampshire, Utah, and California.

Russia was a leading producer in the 19th century and a pinkish orange topaz was mined in the country’s Ural Mountains. This topaz was given the name ‘Imperial topaz’ in honor of the Russian czar and not surprisingly, only members of the royal household were allowed to possess it. In 1740 what was originally thought to be the largest diamond ever found, at 1,640 carats, was found in Brazil and eventually set in the Portuguese crown. The stone is now believed to be, not a diamond, but a colorless topaz.

Topaz is relatively hard compared to other gemstones, with only diamonds, corundum, and chrysoberyl being harder. Although it’s a hard stone, there is a peculiarity in its cleavage that makes it subject to chipping or cracking if it is not cut correctly.

Topaz has a long association with healing powers. African shamans employed it in their rituals, using it for healing. The Hindus believed topaz to be sacred and thought wearing a topaz pendant would bring both longevity as well as wisdom to the wearer. In the European Renaissance, many people thought topaz could calm anger and break spells, cure madness and dispel nightmares. Another popular association, most likely because of the stone’s golden color, was to wealth, with many people believing it had the mystical power to attract gold. Blue topaz is a stone that evokes peacefulness as it soothes, aligns and heals.

Besides being the December birthstone, topaz is given as a gift on the fourth and nineteenth marriage anniversaries, as the stone has often been seen as a symbol of love and affection. Nothing will cheer her this winter like a beautiful sterling silver Irish Claddagh ring with a blue topaz stone set as the heart. Matched with these gorgeous Claddagh earrings with simulated blue topaz stones and this Claddagh pendant with a simulated blue topaz stone set as the heart, this is a gift that will melt the thickest winter ice!

Alexandrite - June’s Color Changing Birthstone

By Julie O'Shaughnessy
on July 08, 2017

June Claddagh Birthstone Pendant Alexandrite Birthstone

Alexandrite, the beautiful June birthstone often described as ‘emerald by day, ruby by night, is named in honor of Russian Czar Alexander II. Legend has it that the future Czar came of age on the same day in 1834 that Alexandrite was discovered in the emerald mines of Russia’s Ural Mountains. Adding to its rich history, the stone’s rich red and green tones were a match for Russia’s military colors and alexandrite was shortly crowned the official gemstone of the Russian Czars.

The astute observational powers of the French mineralogist Nils Gustaf Nordenskiöld who discovered the jewel are responsible for determining that indeed this was not an emerald but a unique gemstone. Only one of three birthstones that can change color (the others being garnet and sapphire) alexandrite is bluish green in natural daylight but under incandescent light appears purplish red. The reason this stone has the ability to change color under differing light conditions is due to the presence of trace amounts of chromium in its makeup. This color change phenomenon is known as the ‘alexandrite effect.’


The presence of chromium perhaps doesn’t seem so surprising since alexandrite was originally discovered in the emerald mines of Russia and emeralds also have trace amounts of chromium. But actually, it’s very unlikely these two elements would combine under just the right conditions to form this gorgeous gem. This makes alexandrite very, very rare, and equally precious.


Although the most vibrant, beautiful and expensive alexandrite originated in the now exhausted mines in Russia, today most stones come from Brazil, Sri Lanka and East Africa. Even diamonds and rubies, popularly considered to be the world’s most expensive gemstones, pale beside the value of the rare and beautiful alexandrite. Because of its rarity and expense, there is a market for synthetic alexandrite. Synthetic alexandrite stones grown in a lab exhibit the same chemical and physical properties as natural alexandrite, the only difference being the stone was made in the laboratory, not in the earth.


Most large alexandrite gemstones are found in old period jewelry belonging to museums and private collectors, as current large stones are extremely rare. Some English Victorian pieces feature relatively large alexandrite stones, but it is the antique Russian jewelry designs that have the largest specimens. The largest cut alexandrite stone is housed in the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C. and is 66 karats. In fact, any alexandrite stone over 3 karats is quite rare and most cut gems weigh less than one karat.


Alexandrite is a durable, hard stone and can be worn daily without worry, but it’s still important to care for this beautiful gemstone properly. Your alexandrite jewelry can be easily cleaned by using mild soap and warm water and can be wiped down using a soft cloth or soft-bristled brush. As always, when caring for fine jewelry, avoid any strong, harsh chemical cleaners and never use bleach. After cleaning, be certain to rinse the piece well to get off any remaining soapy residue. Keep in mind that alexandrites are much harder than many other gemstones and can scratch other softer stones such as spinel, quartz, and tourmaline. Be sure to wrap your alexandrite jewelry pieces in a soft cloth and store them separately from your other jewelry.


In addition to being the June birthstone, alexandrite is the official gem for 55th wedding anniversaries. Good quality alexandrite has clarity and few inclusions, although occasionally needle-like inclusions can create a cat’s eye. Alexandrite is a member of the chrysoberyl family, which not surprisingly, includes two of the most important gem varieties in the world, alexandrite and chrysoberyl cat's eye. So it’s interesting that alexandrite can exhibit two unusual properties in one stone: color change under differing light conditions and the cat’s eye effect from inclusions.

 


The mythology surrounding alexandrite is quite fascinating as the stone is associated with discipline and self-control. It is said that the wearer of alexandrite will strive for excellence and is thought to bring peace of mind and clarity of thinking as well. Russian legend says that the owner of an alexandrite gemstone will possess good luck, good fortune and love and is believed to be a bridge between the physical and spiritual world. Alexandrite’s purported qualities include strong healing energies and are associated with the crown chakra.


Alexandrite has a fascinating history and a piece of jewelry featuring this intriguing stone would make a fine gift for anyone on your list, including those celebrating June birthdays, 55th wedding anniversaries or for anyone who needs a little clarity of thinking as well! A beautiful Irish claddagh ring, in either silver or gold, and set with an alexandrite stone or a lovely claddagh pendant with matching earrings makes a fine gift for a loved one or even for yourself!

Cart Summary

Your cart is empty
  • Celtic Knot Heart Shaped Pendant Necklace
    Celtic Knot Heart Shaped Pendant Necklace Celtic Knot Heart Shaped Pendant Necklace
  • Silver Claddagh Pendant with Hearts and Shamrocks
    Silver Claddagh Pendant with Hearts and Shamrocks Silver Claddagh Pendant with Hearts and Shamrocks
  • Celtic Warrior Sterling Silver & 18K Gold Pendant Necklace (20mm)
    Celtic Warrior Sterling Silver & 18K Gold Pendant Necklace (20mm) Celtic Warrior Sterling Silver & 18K Gold Pendant Necklace (20mm)
  • Claddagh and Trinity Knot CZ Pendant Necklace
    Claddagh and Trinity Knot CZ Pendant Necklace Claddagh and Trinity Knot CZ Pendant Necklace
  • Claddagh Cubic Zirconia Pendant Necklace
    Claddagh Cubic Zirconia Pendant Necklace Claddagh Cubic Zirconia Pendant Necklace
  • Cluster Shamrock & Petals Pendant Necklace
    Cluster Shamrock & Petals Pendant Necklace Cluster Shamrock & Petals Pendant Necklace

Contact

For fastest response, we use Facebook Messenger, and there should be a "Message Us" blue box on the bottom right on each of our website pages. We c...

Read more →

From the Blog

Irish Coffee - History, Heritage and Recipes

Irish Coffee - History, Heritage and Recipes

November 21, 2018

There is nothing more warming and delicious on a cold winter’s eve than Irish coffee, a deceptively simple concoction that...

Read more →